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1.) How Do I know if I have Dry Eye Syndrome?

2.) What is Eye/Ocular Allergy?

3.) How do I find out if I have Eye/Ocular Allergy?

4.) What are cataracts and what are symptoms of cataracts?

5.) How do I know if I need cataract surgery?

6.) How do I know if I have glaucoma?

 


 

 

 

1.) How Do I know if I have Dry Eye Syndrome?

Dry Eyes is a condition caused by changes in the quantity or quality of your tears. Tears are composed of three main layers that work together to keep your eyes comfortable and protected. Aqueous (watery) tear deficiency is caused by either poor production of watery tears or excessive evaporation of the watery tear layer. The following can be the cause(s) of Dry Eyes:

·Poor production of tears by the tear glands may be a result of age, hormonal changes, or various autoimmune diseases, such as primary Sjogren syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, or lupus.

·Evaporative loss of the watery tear layer is usually a result of an insufficient overlying lipid layer.

·Some medications, such as antihistamines, antidepressants, beta-blockers, and oral contraceptives, may decrease tear production.

 

 

 

2.) What is Eye/Ocular Allergy?

Eye/Ocular Allergies develop when the body’s immune system becomes sensitizedand overreacts to something in the environment that typically causes no problem in most people. An allergic reaction can occur when that “something” (called an allergen) comes in contact with antibodies attached to the mast cells in your eyes; the cells respond by releasing histamine and other substances or chemicals that cause tiny blood vessels to leak and the eyes to become itchy, red and watery.

 

 

 

3.) How do I find out if I have Eye/Ocular Allergy?

A Doctor’s Allergy Formula diagnostic test provides eye care providers a comprehensive system to diagnostically test for allergies that may be the underlying cause of ocular surface disease. This test, which is typically covered by major medical insurances, helps to characterize, or rule out, ocular allergies when differentiating ocular surface diseases such as dry eyes, ocular allergies and blepharitis which can have similar signs and symptoms. The knowledge obtained from these test results can help physicians identify the offending allergens and aid in developing a customized treatment protocol.

The FDA-approved in-office Doctor’s Allergy Formula diagnostic test enables eye care practitioners to objectively diagnose and identify the root cause of patient’s ocular allergies. The three-minute ocular allergy diagnostic test utilizes a panel of several allergens that are specific to each region of the country and provides results within 10-15 minutes.

 

 

 

4.) What are cataracts and what are symptoms of cataracts?

A cataract is a cloudiness of the lens in your eye that prevents light from passing to the retina, which can impair your vision. Cataracts form naturally as you age and sometimes remain small and unnoticeable. But with more developed cataracts, it’s like constantly viewing the world through a foggy window.

An annual visit to your eye doctor can help identify cataracts early on, but there are symptoms you can look out for, including:

·Cloudy vision

·Difficulty seeing at night

·Halos around lights

·Frequent changes in glasses or contacts prescriptions

·Double vision in one eye

·Light sensitivity

·Seeing faded colors

 

 

 

5.) How do I know if I need cataract surgery?

You should begin by consulting your eye doctor. He or she will review your medical history and perform tests to determine if you need corrective surgery. Then you can begin to discuss which specific surgery option is best for you.

 

 

 

6.) How do I know if I have glaucoma?

The only way for you to know is to be examined by an eye doctor. Glaucoma has no symptoms until there is damage to your optic nerve. There are many tests that can be performed by an ophthalmologist to identify risk factors and/or presence of glaucoma.